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Biden Orders Stopgap Help Amid Talks   01/22 06:18

   President Joe Biden plans to take executive action Friday to provide a 
stopgap measure of financial relief to millions of Americans while Congress 
begins to consider his much larger $1.9 trillion package to help those affected 
by the coronavirus pandemic.

   BALTIMORE (AP) -- President Joe Biden plans to take executive action Friday 
to provide a stopgap measure of financial relief to millions of Americans while 
Congress begins to consider his much larger $1.9 trillion package to help those 
affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

   The two executive orders that Biden is to sign would increase food aid, 
protect job seekers on unemployment and clear a path for federal workers and 
contractors to get a $15 hourly minimum wage.

   "The American people cannot afford to wait," said Brian Deese, director of 
the White House National Economic Council. "So many are hanging by a thread. 
They need help, and we're committed to doing everything we can to provide that 
help as quickly as possible."

   Deese emphasized that the orders are not substitutes for the additional 
stimulus that Biden says is needed beyond the $4 trillion in aid that has 
already been approved, including $900 billion this past December. Several 
Republican lawmakers have voiced opposition to provisions in Biden's plan for 
direct payments to individuals, state and local government aid and a $15 hourly 
minimum wage nationwide.

   Most economists believe the United States can rebound with strength once 
people are vaccinated from the coronavirus, but the situation is still dire as 
the disease has closed businesses and schools. Nearly 10 million jobs have been 
lost since last February, and nearly 30 million households lack secure access 
to food.

   One of Biden's orders asks the Agriculture Department to consider adjusting 
the rules for food assistance, so that the government could be obligated to 
provide more money to the hungry.

   Children who are unable to get school meals because of remote learning could 
receive a 15% increase in food aid, according to a fact sheet provided by the 
White House. The lowest-income households could qualify for the emergency 
benefits from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. And the formula 
for calculating meal costs could become more generous.

   The order also tries to make it easier for people to claim direct payments 
from prior aid packages and other benefits. In addition, it would create a 
guarantee that workers could still collect unemployment benefits if they refuse 
to take a job that could jeopardize their health.

   Biden's second executive order would restore union bargaining rights revoked 
by the Trump administration, protect the civil service system and promote a $15 
hourly minimum wage for all federal workers. The Democratic president also 
plans to start a 100-day process for the federal government to require its 
contractors to pay at least $15 an hour and provide emergency paid leave to 
workers, which could put pressure on other private employers to boost their 
wages and benefits.

   These orders arrive as the Biden White House has declined to provide a 
timeline for getting its proposed relief package through, saying that officials 
are beginning to schedule meetings with lawmakers to discuss the proposal.

   White House press secretary Jen Psaki said at a Thursday briefing that the 
proposal has support ranging from democratic socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders to 
the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

   But not all components of the package are popular among Republicans, and 
that could delay passage in ways that could injure the economy. Psaki stressed 
that Biden wants any deal to be bipartisan and that the process of meeting with 
lawmakers to talk through the plan is just beginning.

   Biden must balance the need for immediate aid against the risk of prolonged 
negotiations. Psaki said that Biden would not take options off the table but 
later added, "Part of the discussion we'll be having with members is, what do 
you want to cut?"

   Neil Bradley, chief policy officer at the Chamber, told reporters Thursday 
that Congress should act fast to approve the roughly $400 billion for national 
vaccination and reopening schools and other elements of the plan with 
bipartisan support, rather than drag out negotiations.

   "We're not going to let areas of disagreement prevent progress on areas 
where we can find common ground," Bradley said. "We cannot afford six months to 
get the vaccination process working right. ... We can't even wait six weeks to 
get vaccinations distributed and schools reopened."

 
 
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